Getting the customer onboard

Read Time:1 Minute, 19 Second

In the late 80s and early 90s, retail, especially large shops like malls or superstores, was very much the way that people made purchases. However, many managers and store owners, plus the large corporations behind them, wanted to know how they attracted more and more customers. They literally wanted to take the attitude so they could KNOW YOUR CUSTOMER inside out. They all realised that getting the customers to come on board with the brand and what it offered was key. They also knew that the first impression of the store was what was going to decide the visit. They needed that experience to be a good one, and they wondered who it was that the customers saw first and last. It wasn’t the customer service or front-of-house staff; it was, in fact, the trolley collection team.

Image credit

This was a shock to the managers, especially as it is one of the lowest paid and least considered roles in the store. Yet, if the customer had a bad experience at the start, it coloured their view, and if it was bad at the end, it could ruin all the good work done in the store.

Image credit

It’s very much like the situation that we have when trying to sign up to a new website. Companies invest in this process by using experts like w2. Like the trolley person. The onboarding process to get a customer set up can make or break the whole process. The decision to stick with the site hinges greatly on how smooth the onboarding process is.

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Previous post Protect your Garden Shed from Break-Ins
Next post Three Problems to Watch Out For With your Roof